valentine's day spending

Valentine’s Day Spending: “It’s Just This Once”

•  3 minute read

Valentine’s Day is great for couples – and florists and chocolate shops and jewelry retailers and...

Valentine’s Day is great for couples… and florists and chocolate shops and jewelry retailers and...

 

Let’s talk about cheaters, relationships, and Valentine’s Day spending.

 

It's fun to celebrate Valentine’s Day in a way that reflects your personalities. What do you like to do that you don’t get a chance to do often enough?

You’re married. You’ve been faithful since day one. During a night out with friends, you get hit on for the first time since you said “I do.” The person is persistent. You give in.

 

You ask yourself, “Have I been unfaithful for my entire marriage, but just waiting for the opportunity to cheat?” The answer: probably.

 

Now let’s talk about being faithful to a certain lifestyle.

 

Valentine’s Day infidelity

 

You have goals. You want to save money for specific achievements: a down payment on a home, your child’s college education, financial independence… Throughout the year, you save and spend when it’s appropriate. You don’t buy extravagant things because diamonds could never compare with the financial achievements you’re striving to reach.

 

Then Valentine’s Day Spending comes along. Advertisers begin TO hit on you coyly. They’re obviously interested in you.

 

They pursue you. You give in.

 

You ask yourself, “Am I yearning to waste my money, but I just haven’t had the opportunity to express it?”  The answer: probably. Advertisers pursue you to be financially unfaithful; Americans shelled out out nearly $20 billion total to show their “love” in 2016.

 

The moments of how you respond to this game of cat and mouse define who you truly are. Are you really faithful, or do you succumb to Valentine’s Day spending?

 

Isn’t being in a relationship about not wanting to cheat, regardless of the opportunity? Likewise, frugality is about not wanting expensive things, even someone pushes them in your face face, impossible to miss.

 

PENT-UP LUST FOR PEOPLE OR THINGS IS DANGEROUS. YOU COULD EXPLODE.

 

Valentine’s Day is a day when companies use emotion – the most powerful sales technique – to pressure you to purchase things you wouldn’t ordinarily buy. What’s important is to keep things in perspective.

 

Choosing not to celebrate V-Day

 

Nearly 45 percent of Americans did not plan to celebrate Valentine’s Day last year, according to the National Retail Federation. The number remains about the same each year. That means that, regardless of the advertisements, there are plenty of people who don’t celebrate the day. Don’t feel like a monster or a loner if you plan to skip it, as well.

 

If you’re in a relationship, either you, your partner, or both of you may want to celebrate. Valentine’s Day is a good excuse to express how much you care for someone. The only thing to consider is whether or not the expenses you incur on this holiday fit in with your overall financial goals.

 

Make sure you’re not using it as an excuse to blow your budget out of the water. Sure, roses and chocolates are inexpensive, but jewelry? Eek! Stay grounded.

 

It’s fun to celebrate Valentine’s Day in a way that reflects your personalities. What do you like to do that you don’t get a chance to do often enough? Take a weekend trip? Just relax at home for a weekend? Get a couple’s massage? Whatever you enjoy that fits within your lifestyle and your budget is what you should do for Valentine’s Day.

 

Like chocolate and blood sugar, extravagant expenses and your budget do not go well together. Spikes in blood sugar and in expenses are both a dangerous ride.

 

The best Valentine’s Day spending I’ve ever did was when I took a weekend trip out-of-state with the girl I was dating. Come to think of it, I didn’t buy any of the ordinary Valentine’s things: chocolate, roses, teddy bears, jewelry… I spent money on things that matched our personalities, regardless of what advertisers were pushing.

 

Remember, you have greater goals in mind than chocolates. You partner will appreciate that when it comes to how you approach Valentine’s Day spending. If not, you need to wake up and smell the roses.